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Glenn Miller controversy
Aside from all of the information on this page, which includes Chris’s research and stories sent to him, you can also view the documents Chris obtained from the Government when he requested Glenn Miller’s files. To view these documents click here.

THEY SAY Miller's  Plane Went
Down In The English Channel

FIRST ARTICLE PUBLISHED BEFORE 

ACTUAL CONFIRMATION OF HIS DEATH

December 15, 1944,  a cold, wet and foggy afternoon,  Glenn Miller departed RAF-Base, England in a Norseman C-64 aircraft. The flight was to take Glenn Miller and other passengers to Paris. However, the flight never made it. It is believed the aircraft encountered icing conditions over the English Channel and crashed. Glenn Miller and his band had been performing for Allied Troops prior to the crash and was planning on putting on a show in Paris, France.  Glenn Miller and his band was idolized by many during his career. 

             The NORSEMAN C-64 plane IS THE EXACT TYPE OF PLANE Miller          
ALLEGEDLY boarded that fateful night IN DECEMBER 1944.

 

WAS MILLER'S DEATH A COVER UP?

  A German newspaper says wartime bandleader Glenn Miller died of a heart attack in the arms of a French prostitute in 1944 and not, as officially reported, in a plane crash. The mass-circulation Bild newspaper alleged that the famed trombonist and exponent of the big band swing sound met his death in a Paris brothel. The paper said German journalist Udo Ulfkoutte discovered the secret of how he died in U.S. secret service files while doing research for his book, "BND, The Secret Files."  The paper quoted the journalist as saying the true cause of Miller's death was concealed to keep his legend alive and protect the morale of U.S. troops. U.S. military and intelligence officials were not immediately available to comment on the cover-up allegation. 

 

 

Official reports said his plane vanished over the English Channel in December 1944. But Bild said British diver Clive Ward discovered the wreck of his single-motor plane off the French coast in 1985 and found no signs the plane had crashed, or any human remains.  

 

 

SO FAR, ALL OF THIS CLIVE WARD HYPE HAS NEVER BEEN SUSTANTIATED AND MR. WARD CANNOT BE FOUND! 

 

MORE PROBABLE LIES. 

 

 

A retired colonel who says he was Glenn Miller's pilot disputes the claim. Lt. Col. Robert Baker told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram that he and Miller were drinking together in England the night before. "I just know the brothel story is a lie because there was no way Miller could have gotten to Paris by December 15 except on my flight," Baker insisted.

Just two weeks before his death, Miller and his orchestra recorded 20 new tunes in London that were only unearthed in 1995. On the recordings, Miller can be overheard in an unguarded moment flirting with a German girl.

 THESE RECORDINGS ARE NOTHING MORE THAN MILLER EXCHANGING PLEASANTRIES AND ONCE AGAIN THE ALLEGATIONS ARE FOUNDLESS.

In the year before his death, the 40-year-old Miller had a serious illness. And although Baker claims he drank with him, others say Miller was once kicked out of a bar for being a teetotaler.

Supposedly, Miller, another passenger and a pilot took off informally on an uncharted flight without clearance, on a foggy day when all other aircraft were grounded. 

"Why Glenn, who had a real fear of planes, decided to risk a trip under such adverse conditions has never been determined," wrote his friend George Simon, author of the book The Big Band Era and The Glenn Miller Story.

 

 

THE TRUTH MAY BE JUST 

AROUND THE CORNER!

AS OF 5/22/2000, CHRIS VALENTI HAS STARTED HIS OWN RESEARCH INTO THIS HISTORICAL EVENT AND HAS REQUESTED THE SAME SECRET SERVICE FILES AS GERMAN AUTHOR UDO ULFKOUTTE THROUGH THE FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT. PLEASE CHECK BACK PERIODICALLY FOR THE FINAL RESULTS. IT MAY BE A LENGTHY PROCESS, BUT A DEFINITIVE WORD AFTER  ALMOST 60 YEARS MAY BE  JUST AROUND THE CORNER!    

AS OF 10/4/2000, THERE HAS BEEN NO ANSWER ON THE FILES.

12/15/2000 MORE PAPERS WERE FILED!

ON THE 56TH ANNIVERSARY OF HIS DEATH, AFTER STILL 

HEARING NOTHING, CHRIS HIRED AN AGENCY TO FILE MORE

PAPERS. AS OF THIS DATE, HIS MILITARY RECORDS, FBI AND CIA

FILES HAVE BEEN REQUESTED! PLEASE CHECK IN PERIODICALLY.

IT MAY TAKE SOME MORE TIME, BUT WE ARE GETTING CLOSER. AD OF 3/2001 THERE IS TILL NO ANSWER ON THE FILES.

5/22/2002, TWO YEARS TO THE DAY, THE FILES ARRIVED! CLICK HERE

The Glenn Miller Story - the one Hollywood didn't tell

By Arnold Smith 

The expression, "in retrospect" assumes much more meaning as one grows older. The passing of decades seems to bring things that took place many years ago into a clearer focus as all of the facts are finally exposed.

For example, a German newspaper published a story concerning the death in 1944 of Maj. Glenn Miller, the well-known bandleader. But the article fails to tell the complete truth. It is the first time the true story, as I witnessed it over 60 years ago, will now be exposed in print.

Few remember Glenn Miller. He was one of the most famous bandleaders of the '30s and '40s. A movie was made about him; he was played by Jimmy Stewart and his wife was played by June Allyson. During WWII, Miller enlisted in the Army Air Core, and was promoted to major. He and his musical group were sent to England where he entertained troops. After the liberation of Paris, he and his band were soon appearing at a place called Rainbow Corners, atop the Hotel de Paree. I had recently been released from an Army hospital in Nancy, located in the south of France, and had received 10 days of R&R (rest and relaxation).

My quarters were in this same deluxe Hotel de Paree, but I was in no condition, mentally or physically, to either go boozing, dancing, or chippy chasing. God knows all three were there for the asking. I had been in combat off and on since shortly after Operation Anvil, (the invasion of Southern France) and had reached the decision that all I wanted to do was go home.

America was called the Zone of the Interior, or to the GIs, heaven. I spent most of my waking time walking the beautiful streets and boulevards of Paris, taking in many of the famous sites, and chatting with the MP who had a station next to the lobby of my quarters. We played pinochle almost every night, and swapped stories. The majority of these guys were combat vets, and we had a lot in common.

One evening around 11 p.m. we were involved in a four-handed game, and my partner had just bid 300, when an urgent call came over the radio about a shooting involving an American officer. It was early December 1944 and we all thought the damned war was almost over - but here we go again. Without any questions I was included in the group, and we mounted the waiting jeeps and took off. Paris is a big city, but we were only about 2 miles from the scene, and there was little traffic from the local civilian population due to lack of fuel.

When we arrived at the site the French police were there, as were other MPs. I stood on the side as a stretcher was being brought down from a second-floor apartment with a blanket partially covering a nude body. There were over 30 officers milling about, and I saw one of them rip a camera from a GI's hands, and remove the film. In just moments MPs sealed off the whole area, and we watched as the body was loaded into a GI ambulance. It quickly disappeared en route to the military hospital on the other side of the Seine River.

A young French civilian was then brought down in handcuffs, and loaded aboard another jeep. We could see that he was also in leg cuffs. We quickly heard what all the fuss was about: The dead man, an Army officer, was none other than Maj. Glenn Miller, the famous band leader who had a wife back in the States.

It was not until the next day that the story got around. Seems that Maj. Miller was having an affair with a French widow whose husband had died years before in the fighting around Dunkirk. The husband had been reported by the French army as having died fighting the Germans. Well, it seems he had not been killed but taken prisoner. He had never been allowed to write to his young wife of less than a year, and she was certain that he was indeed dead - after all, almost five years had passed. But when the American forces began liberating prison camps, this poor Frenchman was at last set free, and he began his trip back to his young wife, family and home. There were no phones or postal systems to call ahead. And, the war was by no means over.

He had little problems hitch-hiking to Paris, and soon found himself again on familiar streets. It is easy to imagine the joy and elation he must have felt upon once again seeing his almost forgotten Paris and the yearning for his bride. When he saw his name still upon the mailbox in the entry of the building in which they had rented an apartment, he raced up the aged staircase in happy anticipation of being reunited with his beloved wife. He burst through the door and there he saw his bride in the arms of another man. He had a German Walthers pistol in his pocket, the gift of a kind and concerned American GI - and in an instant he fired. The stranger in his bed was dead.

Yes, it was duly reported by the American War Dept. that Maj. Glenn Miller was lost in a plane on a short flight from London to Paris. However, don't ever try to discover who piloted the plane, its serial number, or who else was on board. No bodies were reported as being recovered, or any plane parts. Some things are best forgotten, and Glenn Miller was at the time an American icon.

It was, it now is revealed, just another case of being in the wrong place at the wrong time.

By ARNOLD SMITH of Southhampton, PA. 

Glenn Miller Spent His Last Hours With My Dad
By Brian McCulloch

The story of Glenn Miller's disappearance began for me at the age of six, when my family went to see the movie, The Glenn Miller Story. My dad leaned over to my mother and said, "they don't have that quite right."

He was referring to the scene where Glenn Miller leaves Twinwood Airfield in Bedfordshire, England. When we left the theater, I asked my father what he had meant with his comment.

He told me that he was Glenn Miller's driver the day Miller disappeared. He added that the vehicle was a staff car, not a jeep and that he was a Staff Sergeant, not an officer. Later, I was to learn the personal significance of the latter part of the answer to my question.

My mother said she was going to write to Hollywood to set the record straight. "They should have found my him – Hollywood isn't that far from here." We were living in San Lorenzo, California. Forty-nine years would pass for my dad's role in the story of that day in December 1944, when the Miller legend was born, to become public.

S/Sgt. Edward H. McCulloch was the driver of the Commanding Officer of the Eighth Air Force Service Command, which was headquartered at Milton Ernest Hall in Bedfordshire, England. Colonel James Early detailed my dad to drive Major Miller and his pilot, a Warrant Officer from the Temporary Officers Quarters at Milton Ernest Hall to the airfield for the flight to France.

In a conversation last week, my father told me that he approached Miller the evening before to tell him that he would be his driver the next day. Miller had been chatting with several enlisted men when my dad introduced himself.

Major Miller asked my dad if he would take him to the NCO Club. My father responded, "With all due respect Sir, you are an officer." To this Miller replied that he preferred the company of enlisted men and wanted to enjoy his evening. My dad remembers Miller saying, "some of the officers can be pretty stuffy."

After walking with the Major to the NCO Club and introducing him to the some of the other non-commissioned officers, my dad says he left, as he was on duty. He was billeted in a manor house several miles away in Pavenham Bury with Colonel Early, two other officers and another non-commissioned officer.

The time of Miller's flight had been scheduled to take advantage of available daylight. My father believes the flight to have been laid on specifically for Miller possibly by Early, perhaps at the request of other senior officers.

Colonel Early told my dad that Glenn Miller's pilot was a twenty-five-mission man, waiting to go home. Recently my dad said, "He probably volunteered to fly Miller as much out of boredom as anything else. After all, Paris is not very far from that part of England. It should have been an easy flight there and back." The irony of the event was not lost on my father.

While the weather had been bad for several days, it had improved by the time they got to the airfield, in my dad's recollection. "There was an overcast, but it was above minimums at Twinwood."

"On the other hand, I remember thinking that I was glad not to be piloting the plane. I knew how quickly the fog could drop and how dense it was in England. As a driver, I had to contend with it all the time."

More interestingly, my dad remembers the plane that day to more closely resemble a Traveler, a biplane than the currently credited Norseman, a high wing monoplane. As a flight Cadet, he had trained in biplanes. Also, he does not remember a plane as large as the one used in the movie.

After picking-up the Major and the Warrant Officer at the Milton Ernest Hall TOQ, McCulloch drove directly to the airfield at Twinwood, several miles away. As he remembers it today, as well as in 1953, the plane was there when they entered the airfield.

They drove up to the plane. My dad got out and opened the door for the Major and got Miller's flight bag from the trunk of the Colonel's staff car. "It was a Dodge - we would never have used a jeep, especially an open one like the one in the movie, in England at that time of year.

Handing the Major his bag, my dad remembers saying a simple "have a good flight." Miller and the pilot boarded the plane. My dad did not see another passenger, although he agrees that another passenger could have already been on the plane. Both the car and the plane left the airfield at the same time.

Several hours later, the military police and/or intelligence arrived at Milton Ernest Hall. Colonel Early later told my father that they had collected a footlocker and some other personal affects left behind by Major Miller. The Colonel ordered him not to mention Miller's most recent stay at Milton Ernest.

He said nothing until he got home. There is not a mention in any of the letters or V-Mail to my mother – she saved all of them. There is, however, confirmation of his presence at Milton Ernest on December 13,1944 in them.

As for his impression of Glenn Miller during those last hours? My dad says that he seemed like a regular guy. He wore his billed hat without the wire brim, which was the way with many of the wartime US Army Air Corp personnel in England.

We may never know what became of Glenn Miller, but I know and now you do, whom Glenn Miller spent some of his last hours with – my dad. The uniform jacket he wore that day will be on permanent loan, along with his pictures of Pavenham Bury and Milton Ernest Hall, at the Twinwood Control Tower museum, near where my dad spent a year and half of his life and Glenn Miller left to become a legend.

Copyright 2002 Brian C. McCulloch - Shoreline, WA


The most popular Bandleader of the Swing-era was Alton Glenn Miller who was born on Mar. 1. 1904 in a small town called Clarinda, in the state of Iowa. He soon began to hate his name, because his mother would call for him, shouting at the top of her lungs. After having read and studied everything he could find about music and doing little jobs on the side, he had been allowed to set up a band for Ray Noble in winter 1934/35. Miller played the trombone and wrote the music, which was already very much his own unique style. On 25th of April 1935 Glenn Miller played his first 4 titles under his own name for Columbia. But the real "Glenn Miller Orchestra" was set up only in March of 1937. Appearances for Decca and Brunswick and a couple of concerts followed, but the band did not get have its real break-through.
 

In March of 1938 Miller started playing with a new band, practicing with Tex Beneke and Ray Eberle. The first big performance was at the "Paradise Restaurant" in N.Y. in June of the same year. The final break-through for the Glenn Miller Band was the performance at the famous "Glen Island Casino" in New Rochelle, New York. Now the "Glenn Miller Sound" had practically became No. 1 in America, and this overnight. At the peak of his popularity 20th Century Fox produced two films "Sun Valley Serenade" (1942) with the Glenn Miller Band. Extremely popular became the radio series where G. Miller played for Chesterfield between 12/17 1939 and 9/24 1942. In autumn 1942 G. Miller joined the Army as Captain. After more than a year of being in the "US Army Air Force Band" Miller boarded the Queen Elisabeth on June 22, 1944 at the port of New York, pier #90 to go to Europe. 

From then the band played for hundreds of radio broadcasts in England and sometimes some of these were even "propaganda broadcasts", that were translated into German for the rest of Europe. Still today you can listen to Glenn Millers attempts at speaking German on discs. On Dec. 15. 1944, a cold winters day Glenn Miller, together with Lt. Col. Norman, F. Baessell and the pilot F/O John R.S. Morgan boarded the Noordwyn "Norseman" at the airport, at Twinwood Farm, near Bedford, by London, to fly to Paris, where he intended to prepare a performance at "Olympia". The airplane was never seen again and the three men were reported as "missing". Since then the wild stories have been invented about Glenn Millers disappearance. The most probable theory is that the airplane for some reasons crashed and fell into the British Channel. The AEF Band, carried on playing and supporting their troops, even without their big leader, and Jerry Gray conducted them until November the 17th 1945 when they gave their last concert.


 

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Glenn Miller Conspiracy